From Novice to Expert

Tony Schwartz over at Harvard Business Review gets it exactly right: the key to excellence is practice.  Specifically, deliberate practice.  Building on the work of Anders Ericsson, Schwartz argues that whatever role our genetic inheritance plays, it is the type of effort we put into an endeavor that determines how good we become:

Like everyone who studies performance, I’m indebted to the extraordinary Anders Ericsson, arguably the world’s leading researcher into high performance. For more than two decades, Ericsson has been making the case that it’s not inherited talent which determines how good we become at something, but rather how hard we’re willing to work — something he calls “deliberate practice.” Numerous researchers now agree that 10,000 hours of such practice as the minimum necessary to achieve expertise in any complex domain.

Ericsson’s research on human performance and what it takes to move from novice to expert has informed our own research here at MetaMetrics and has recently been popularized by writers like Geoffrey Colvin and Malcom Gladwell.  As Malbert Smith has written in ‘Education Reform: Making this the ‘Best of Times’: (more…)

MetaMetrics is an educational measurement organization. Our renowned psychometric team develops scientific measures of student achievement that link assessment with targeted instruction to improve learning.