Free Lexile Resource: Online Databases

Ever wonder how to access a variety of free text resources that match your child’s or student’s reading ability? In most states across the country access to periodical database services is made available to educators, parents, students and other citizens. Some of these periodical database services provide Lexile measures for millions of newspaper and magazine articles, as well as encyclopedia and reference content. Database providers include EBSCO, Gale, Grolier, ProQuest, and others.

Through these databases, texts are made available to educators, students and parents in each state. For a list of available databases containing Lexile measured texts by state, please see our Guide to Online Periodical Databases Offering Lexile Measures. Talk to your district media services coordinator about accessing these online databases and the Lexile measured texts they contain or visit your state’s database website for more information.

Want to keep up to date on the free Lexile resources available to you? Visit Lexile.com and sign up to receive our email updates.

Literature That Will Enrich Mathematics

Embracing literature to enhance mathematics instruction in the classroom or at home benefits students by providing a richer and more meaningful perspective of mathematics. Connecting children’s literature with mathematics is an effective avenue for promoting problem solving, communicating in mathematics, and make connections between the mathematics needed in multiple disciplines. The paper “Using Children’s Literature to Teach Mathematics” presented on The Quantile® Framework for Mathematics site offers teachers and parents helpful suggestions for identifying literature that will support mathematics instruction and engage students.

An appropriate book to enhance an effective mathematics lesson should have an authentic context that includes real-life experiences, multi-cultural components, and enjoyable plots that unite mathematics and literacy. A report titled “Making Informed Choices: Selecting Children’s Trade Books for Mathematics Instruction” by S. J. Hellwig, Eula E. Monroe, and James S. Jacobs (2000) offers suggestions for identifying books that will support instruction and create meaningful and explicit connections to engage students. The article offers pointers for choosing appropriate children’s literature with mathematics topics. An appropriate book should:

  • represent mathematics and other information accurately and depict mathematics relationships correctly.
  • presents factual information, uses terminology appropriately, and portrays mathematical principles accurately.
  • includes a format and presentation that are visually and verbally appealing.
  • offers interest and pleasure without overpowering the text with mathematical processes and terminology.
  • provides a context for learners to make meaningful connections between mathematics and personal experiences.
  • easily connects the mathematical process or experience to the resolution of the story.
  • presents concepts in a way that appeals to a range of audiences and abilities.
  • appeals to a variety of interests, cultures, and/or experiences.
  • offers layers of richness beyond the predictable or expected and presents exciting new views or ideas.
  • engages students with a story that layers the unexpected with original insights or surprising events.

The study of mathematics is not just about learning mathematical processes and memorizing facts and algorithms. Mathematics becomes more visible in everyday life when students discuss the uses and advantages of applying math in various situations and recognize the necessity of mathematics in careers, personal budgets, traveling, and even games. What better way to promote those discussions when so many children’s books are available to add fun and interest to topics in mathematics?

Celebrate Storytelling in Mathematics

September 25th is Math Storytelling Day! MetaMetrics® offers Lexile “Find a Book” so that educators and families can use student Lexile® measures to make informed decisions about reading materials that both interest children and are at reading levels appropriate for them to understand the material. Likewise, on quantiles.com MetaMetrics offers Math Literature Guides that accompany children’s books so that teachers and parents can use student Quantile® measures to engage children with appropriate topics in mathematics. Because this is the week of storytelling in mathematics, we want to share some Math Literature Guides that serve as samples for a variety of mathematics skills and concepts.

A simple topic for the early mathematics learner is working with ordinal numbers, such as first, second, third, and fourth. A fun book to read is Trouble on the T-Ball Team by Eve Bunting. The Math Literature Guide for this book offers ideas for using ordinal numbers at sports events (third quarter of a football game), in routine events of the day, or when losing the first tooth. In the Math Literature Guide, notice the blue title of the book. This means that when you click the title, you will be taken to the Lexile “Find a Book” page for that book.  On that page in the right-hand column is a drop-down menu called “Find This Book.” Select “World Cat” in that drop-down list to see libraries near your home where you might find the book. You can also select “Barnes & Noble” or “Amazon” to purchase the book.

For children a little older, another more challenging math topic is counting to a million, the subject of the book, A Million Dots by Andrew Clements.  Dots are everywhere in the book and the challenge is to find the dot that is indicated by the number on the page. The Math Literature Guide for this book offers ideas for questions that will encourage children to think critically when comparing such large numbers.

Geometry topics are the subject of many children’s books. One example is Sir Cumference and the Great Knight of Angleland by Cindy Neuschwander. This book includes some plays on words about angles and circles. By fifth grade, students are learning about right angles, acute angles, and obtuse angles. So the Math Literature Guide for the book offers ideas for finding different types of angles in the book and for thinking about where angles are found in architecture, design, and nature.

Mathematics is everywhere in our world but can seem to be invisible unless we take the time to point it out. Reading children’s books that accentuate the uses of mathematics offers insight and appreciation for the role of mathematics in our lives. Talking about the books we read makes reading more fun as well.  Sunday, September 25, is Math Storytelling Day, so take a trip to the library where you will find books that reveal mathematics in unexpected places to kick off a week of pleasure in reading books about mathematics. Read and enjoy!

Story Telling in Mathematics

Many people have fond memories of mom or dad putting them to bed with favorite bedtime stories. I recall the precious memory of a parent reading a fun story just before I snuggled into bed for the night. I also have a special memory of the bedtime hour when my dad was home to tuck me in. He did not read stories to me. He gave me “algebra” problems. From the time I was in third grade and up, he would ask, “A number plus 8 is 15. What is the number?” Now as a grandmother, I play “Mystery Number” with my grandchildren at bedtime. They never fail to follow their answer with “Give me another one, Grandma!”

My bedtime memories were a good combination of mathematics and literacy. The benefits of reading to our children are enduring. Through books, children appreciate experiences of others that often relate to their own experiences, expectations, and dreams. Children’s books can also help to teach the concepts and uses of mathematics.

Math Storytelling Day is coming up! According to their website, September 25 is set aside every year to celebrate the many ways that mathematics is used in our daily lives. “Math Storytelling Day is a great opportunity to get children excited about math through stories and games. Math stories can include logic, patterns, puzzles and numbers.”

A great place to find mathematical resources, such as games, activities, websites, tutorials, and videos is quantiles.com. Parents and teachers can access resources that are targeted to a child’s mathematical ability level based on The Quantile® Framework for Mathematics.  This learning community for teachers, parents, and students also includes helpful articles such as “The Quantile Framework for Mathematics in the Home.” As well as those ideas listed in the article, another simple convenient way to encourage a strong appreciation for the mathematics people use every day is to read books about math topics that inspire children to appreciate and enjoy mathematics.

The website quantiles.com lists children’s books that teach mathematics and offers Math Literature Guides that detail specifics about how to connect mathematics and literature. Each Math Literature Guide includes a series of questions and activities that promote ways for parent to talk about mathematics with their children. One example is the Math Literature Guide for the book Keep Your Distance, a fun and humorous book about measuring lengths with inches, feet, and miles by Gail Herman.

To celebrate Math Storytelling Day this year, the Quantile Team at MetaMetrics will share more book titles and Math Literature Guides about various topics in mathematics. Math storytelling can be an enjoyable experience for parents, teachers, and students as they focus on the ways mathematics is used daily. Stay tuned!

Gold in Math Olympiad

The 2016 Rio Olympic Games finished almost a month ago with the U.S. winning a total of 121 medals, which is almost double that of Britain in second place.  While we are still celebrating our nation’s athletic prowess, we should also be touting our academic success — the U.S recently won its second consecutive gold medal at the International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO). The IMO is an annual competition for high school students held each year in a different country. The two-day competition requires students to complete 3 problems each day in 4 ½ hours. Here is an example problem:

“In Lineland there are n ≥ 1 towns, arranged along a road running from left to right. Each town has a left bulldozer (put to the left of the town and facing left) and a right bulldozer (put to the right of the town and facing right). The sizes of the 2n bulldozers are distinct. Every time when a right and a left bulldozer confront each other, the larger bulldozer pushes the smaller one off the road. On the other hand, the bulldozers are quite unprotected at their rears; so, if a bulldozer reaches the rear-end of another one, the first one pushes the second one off the road, regardless of their sizes. Let A and B be two towns, with B being to the right of A. We say that town A can sweep town B away if the right bulldozer of A can move over to B pushing off all bulldozers it meets. Similarly, B can sweep A away if the left bulldozer of B can move to A pushing off all bulldozers of all towns on its way. Prove that there is exactly one town which cannot be swept away by any other one. (Estonia)”

In the podcast “Count One More Gold for The U.S. — In MathJody Avirgan interviews Po-Shen Loh, the U.S. team coach. Loh, once a team member and now a professor at Carnegie Mellon University, thinks that just as the U.S. Olympics inspires young athletes, the IMO can likewise encourage students to be interested in mathematics. “I think that mathematics is similar to sports in the sense that if you do more practice, you actually get significantly better,” states Loh. “And the big question then becomes, ‘How do we convince people that doing that practice in mathematics is a fun, fruitful, exciting thing to do?’”

Good question, Professor Loh. One way we can encourage fun mathematics practice is through the use of math games. A quick internet search yields hundreds of math game sites. For a more precise approach to finding math games, teachers and parents can use the free resources available on quantiles.com.  At the site, click “Use the Quantile Framework” at the top of home page. Then select “Math Skills Database” and “Keyword Search.” Enter a keyword such as “Operations.”  A list of Quantile Skill and Concepts (QSCs) targeted to the topic will appear. Suppose you want to practice “Order of Operations.” Click the QSC “Use order of operations including parentheses and other grouping symbols to simplify numerical expressions.” Then click” Show 18 Resources” to view the free resources calibrated to that skill. There are several math games listed to help students practice math AND have fun.  

Lexile by Chapter Guides: Expanded Offerings for a New School Year!

A flurry flutters throughout our nation’s schools as instructors clean classrooms and libraries. Bookshelves are being rearranged. Teachers frantically organize their textbooks and create new bulletin boards. This month, educators gear up with excitement, and refresh their materials (and themselves!) for a new school year. Here at MetaMetrics (developer of Lexile measures), we’re refreshing some of our resources for you too!

Launched last fall, Lexile by Chapter Guides have drawn considerable attention to the utility of Lexile measures in instructional planning. In particular (and as articulated in Tim Shanahan’s blog post this past June), this work helps grades 2-12 teachers think beyond merely using text complexity measures as a way to assign certain texts to students based upon their reading ability. Instead, these Guides help teachers think more about the kinds of instructional scaffolding needed to bridge the gap between the difficulty a particular text presents and the individual student’s unique reading abilities. With a deeper understanding of both the complexity within a book and the reading ability of individual students, educators can more thoroughly explore and prepare for those reader and task considerations in the classroom.

MetaMetrics is pleased to announce that we have added 38 new Lexile by Chapter Guides (LbC) for 33 different titles to our collection. These new Guides are available, along with our previous offerings, on the LbC webpage here. The new titles included represent many books that have been requested by teachers and librarians through our feedback survey; our research into frequently taught full-length works at various grade levels; and also a few that serve to illustrate the importance of this work for instructional planning.

Perhaps most exciting in our new offerings is the inclusion of 16 non-fiction, informational texts. These non-fiction titles (many of which also have discussion guides for teachers collected here) will help provide teachers of science, mathematics, history, social studies, and other content areas access to the same information teachers of literature have enjoyed over the past year.

The planning and preparation that goes on in schools this time of year becomes the foundation for student success over the next many months. We hope Lexile by Chapter Guides are a part of that planning and preparation too. Whether teachers are using these Guides to help them better understand the needs of their instruction, or whether they are sharing them with students to help them anticipate and plan for their own independent reading, Lexile by Chapter Guides are a treasure trove of information that help to spur everyone toward success!

New Summer Reading Log

Kick start summer reading with our new downloadable Summer Reading Log and Lexile “Find a Book”. Search our extensive database for books within a child’s Lexile range. Enter the child’s Lexile measure, then narrow the search by selecting topics of interest. You can also use “Find a Book” to check the availability of books at local libraries or purchase titles from major booksellers. When using “Find a Book”, don’t forget to submit your Summer Reading Pledge. Track a child’s reading with our summer reading log and when summer is over; share it with the child’s teacher to show his or her dedication to reading.

The Quantile Framework By The Numbers

Want to learn about the Quantile® Framework for Mathematics? View our brand new Quantile Infographic to find everything you need to know about the Quantile Framework in one easy to understand graphic. Learn the basic concepts of the Quantile Framework, find out how students receive Quantile measures, where you can find Quantile measured content, and see an overview of the free math resources available on Quantiles.com. View the full infographic and download a printer-friendly version of your own.

While you’re visiting Quantiles.com please take some time to explore all the wealth of information and mathematics resources made available for your use. And don’t forget to sign up for the 2016 Quantile Summer Math Challenge!

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Happy Holidays From MetaMetrics!

As the holidays and the end of the year approach we’d like to take a moment to reflect on 2015. It’s been an exciting year for us here at MetaMetrics and an exciting time in the world of education. We have been happy to watch as our two core products, The Lexile Framework for Reading and The Quantile Framework for Mathematics, continue to expand both domestically and globally.

While we we can boast of many achievements this year, some of our proudest moments include the debut of the Lexile Career Database and the Lexile by Chapter Guides; increased participation in the CCSSO Chief’s Summer Learning Challenge and the Summer Math Challenge; numerous research publications and many new product and publishing partnerships.

This holiday season, we invite you to join us in supporting First Book. First Book provides new books to children in need throughout the United States and Canada. With over 135 million books distributed so far, First Book is making huge strides towards solving ton of the biggest challenges faced in the development of literacy—access to books. Please join us as we help to spread some joy and holiday cheer with the gift of books. 

From our family to yours, we wish you a very happy holiday season! For a few laughs we invite you to view our company holiday video and learn about our newest “product”, The Giftile Framework for Giving.

Unpacking the Complexity Within the Text Complexity Measure

By Malbert Smith III, Ph.D. and Matt Copeland

With the recent release of Harper Lee’s Go Set a Watchman, there is renewed interest in her classic, To Kill a Mockingbird. In fact, Brody and Maloney (Wall Street Journal, July 14, 2015) argue that teachers need to rethink how they teach To Kill a Mockingbird in light of the themes in Go Set a Watchman. The timing of this release also corresponds to the five year anniversary of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). Regardless of where you land on the merits of the CCSS, it has brought a renewed instructional emphasis on the concepts of text complexity and close reading.

With the next generation of standards’ emphasis on increasing the diet of non-fiction and the number and quality of complex texts that are taught, there was concern among some teachers that many of our canonical texts (particularly fiction) taught in middle and high school did not appear to satisfy the text complexity requirement. For example, when one examines the quantitative leg of the text complexity triangle, To Kill a Mockingbird has a measure of 790L which corresponds to the recommended grade level of 4 to 5 in Appendix A of CCSS. However, when one examines the qualitative and reader/task legs of the triangle, the authors of the CCSS in Appendix B adjust the recommended level to grades 9-10 where this novel is typically taught.

Shanahan and Duffett (2013) reported that, like Mockingbird, seven of the ten most popular books taught in middle school and five of the top ten books taught in high school are not challenging enough on the quantitative index. Against this backdrop ELA teachers in middle and high school have been asking whether these classic books can satisfy the requirements of close reading of complex text. And the answer is that these books are outstanding not only on the quality and reader/task dimensions but also along the dimension of quantitative measures of text complexity. In fact, when we dig a little deeper into these individual works, we often find that there is sufficient complexity—even based upon the quantitative index alone—to warrant their inclusion in our curricula.

But beyond the consideration of what works we teach, another important consideration are the instructional practices that we use to deliver that learning to students. Certainly, close reading and the reader and task considerations within the CCSS text complexity model are essential; they provide the framework for thinking through the kinds of instructional scaffolding we might provide to help students be successful. As classrooms around the country prepare to begin another school year anew, helping practitioners to examine the complexity of a text and even the finer grain details of the quantitative index, might be a rich resource for more data-driven instructional planning.

To this end, MetaMetrics is unveiling the beginnings of a new line of research: chapter-by-chapter graphs (such as the one shown below for Mockingbird [Figure 1]) of the Lexile measures of chapters within an individual work. Our belief is that equipped with this type of information instructional leaders can make decisions on how best to focus their instruction time and thereby have an even more profound positive impact on student learning.

Figure 1. Lexile measures by chapter for To Kill a Mockingbird.  Fig1

As one can see in Figure 1, while the overall text complexity measure of Mockingbird is 790L within the entire book, there is substantial variation among the individual chapters of the novel. In fact, of the novel’s 31 chapters, 18 chapters fall above the entire work’s Lexile measure of 790L, while only 13 chapters fall below the 790L mark. And while only one chapter (Chapter 20—part of the courtroom scene) falls within the Grades 9-10 text complexity band, five more chapters come within 100L of that range. From this graph, we believe it is easy to see that there are a number of opportunities to present sufficiently complex text to students and to provide the close reading opportunities and instructional scaffolding our students may need.

Interestingly, when we have asked ELA teachers of Mockingbird to predict which specific chapters of the novel might be more complex than others, they typically predict the same ones that the quantitative measures identify. This would seem to support the notion that many practicing classroom teachers are quite adept at selecting texts that provide sufficient complexity for their students’ learning and understand—even intuitively—where the complexity resides. However, making these realities more concrete in our minds offers us a number of opportunities to reflect upon our instruction.

As an extension of this work, we have gone a step farther and also begun to examine each paragraph within a particular chapter. Just as we see variation among the Lexile measures of individual chapters, we see even more variation among the paragraphs within a chapter. For example, when we examined the complexity within Chapter 13 of Mockingbird [Figure 2], it became clear to us that although the overall measure of this chapter is 1020L—just below the text complexity grade band range for Grades 9-10—there does exist a sequence of about 20 paragraphs that overwhelmingly do fall in the text complexity grade band and, in fact, even exceed that grade band in one instance. The opportunities to engage students in close reading of text at the appropriate level within these 20 paragraphs seem rich on the surface. An examination of the content of those paragraphs—the scene where the young narrator of the novel, Scout, comments on the arrival of her Aunt Alexandra, the relationship Alexandra maintains with her brother, Atticus, and her staunch belief in the importance of family and social traditions—confirms the importance of the passage to the novel as a whole. And, perhaps, becomes even more important now given the narrative presented in Go Set a Watchman.

 Figure 2. Lexile measures by paragraph for Chapter 13 of To Kill a Mockingbird. fig2

As a former high school ELA teacher, I (Matt) now see how examining and unpacking the empirical text complexity measure of books could have helped me greatly in planning for instruction. For example, I see more clearly now where the opportunities for close reading exist within the novel. I would rethink the reading schedule I typically hand to students at the beginning of the unit to highlight these “peaks” of complexity within the work and spend more time focusing my efforts on providing my students—particularly my struggling readers—the instructional scaffolding they need in order to be successful with these chapters. The possibilities seem endless.

If we desire to meet the ideals embodied in the next generation of standards, educators need time, tools, and resources. Even within the text complexity model itself, such opportunities do exist. Our challenge is to harness these opportunities, embrace them, and empower changes to our curricula and—even more importantly—to our instructional practice.

As we think about the needs of our students and re-think some of our curricula and instruction, Scout’s wisdom and insight from the end of To Kill a Mockingbird, when she finally stands upon Boo Radley’s front porch, seem all that much more relevant: “I had never seen our neighborhood from this angle.”

For more information and to view the collection of available Lexile by Chapter Guides, please visit lexile.com/lexile-by-chapter/.

References

Brody, L.  & Maloney, J. (2014, July 14). Teachers’ new homework: a ‘Watchman’ Plan. The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved from http://www.wsj.com/articles/teachers-new-homework-a-watchman-plan-1436917909

Lee, H. (2015). To Kill a Mockingbird. New York: HarperCollins.

Lee, H. (2015). Go Set a Watchman. New York: HarperCollins.

Shanahan, T. & Duffett, A. (2013). Common Core in the Schools: A First Look at Reading Assignments. Washington DC: Thomas B. Fordham Institute. Retrieved from http://edexcellence.net/publications/common-core-in-the-schools

MetaMetrics is an educational measurement organization. Our renowned psychometric team develops scientific measures of student achievement that link assessment with targeted instruction to improve learning.