Story Telling in Mathematics

Many people have fond memories of mom or dad putting them to bed with favorite bedtime stories. I recall the precious memory of a parent reading a fun story just before I snuggled into bed for the night. I also have a special memory of the bedtime hour when my dad was home to tuck me in. He did not read stories to me. He gave me “algebra” problems. From the time I was in third grade and up, he would ask, “A number plus 8 is 15. What is the number?” Now as a grandmother, I play “Mystery Number” with my grandchildren at bedtime. They never fail to follow their answer with “Give me another one, Grandma!”

My bedtime memories were a good combination of mathematics and literacy. The benefits of reading to our children are enduring. Through books, children appreciate experiences of others that often relate to their own experiences, expectations, and dreams. Children’s books can also help to teach the concepts and uses of mathematics.

Math Storytelling Day is coming up! According to their website, September 25 is set aside every year to celebrate the many ways that mathematics is used in our daily lives. “Math Storytelling Day is a great opportunity to get children excited about math through stories and games. Math stories can include logic, patterns, puzzles and numbers.”

A great place to find mathematical resources, such as games, activities, websites, tutorials, and videos is quantiles.com. Parents and teachers can access resources that are targeted to a child’s mathematical ability level based on The Quantile® Framework for Mathematics.  This learning community for teachers, parents, and students also includes helpful articles such as “The Quantile Framework for Mathematics in the Home.” As well as those ideas listed in the article, another simple convenient way to encourage a strong appreciation for the mathematics people use every day is to read books about math topics that inspire children to appreciate and enjoy mathematics.

The website quantiles.com lists children’s books that teach mathematics and offers Math Literature Guides that detail specifics about how to connect mathematics and literature. Each Math Literature Guide includes a series of questions and activities that promote ways for parent to talk about mathematics with their children. One example is the Math Literature Guide for the book Keep Your Distance, a fun and humorous book about measuring lengths with inches, feet, and miles by Gail Herman.

To celebrate Math Storytelling Day this year, the Quantile Team at MetaMetrics will share more book titles and Math Literature Guides about various topics in mathematics. Math storytelling can be an enjoyable experience for parents, teachers, and students as they focus on the ways mathematics is used daily. Stay tuned!

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