Celebrate Storytelling in Mathematics

September 25th is Math Storytelling Day! MetaMetrics® offers Lexile “Find a Book” so that educators and families can use student Lexile® measures to make informed decisions about reading materials that both interest children and are at reading levels appropriate for them to understand the material. Likewise, on quantiles.com MetaMetrics offers Math Literature Guides that accompany children’s books so that teachers and parents can use student Quantile® measures to engage children with appropriate topics in mathematics. Because this is the week of storytelling in mathematics, we want to share some Math Literature Guides that serve as samples for a variety of mathematics skills and concepts.

A simple topic for the early mathematics learner is working with ordinal numbers, such as first, second, third, and fourth. A fun book to read is Trouble on the T-Ball Team by Eve Bunting. The Math Literature Guide for this book offers ideas for using ordinal numbers at sports events (third quarter of a football game), in routine events of the day, or when losing the first tooth. In the Math Literature Guide, notice the blue title of the book. This means that when you click the title, you will be taken to the Lexile “Find a Book” page for that book.  On that page in the right-hand column is a drop-down menu called “Find This Book.” Select “World Cat” in that drop-down list to see libraries near your home where you might find the book. You can also select “Barnes & Noble” or “Amazon” to purchase the book.

For children a little older, another more challenging math topic is counting to a million, the subject of the book, A Million Dots by Andrew Clements.  Dots are everywhere in the book and the challenge is to find the dot that is indicated by the number on the page. The Math Literature Guide for this book offers ideas for questions that will encourage children to think critically when comparing such large numbers.

Geometry topics are the subject of many children’s books. One example is Sir Cumference and the Great Knight of Angleland by Cindy Neuschwander. This book includes some plays on words about angles and circles. By fifth grade, students are learning about right angles, acute angles, and obtuse angles. So the Math Literature Guide for the book offers ideas for finding different types of angles in the book and for thinking about where angles are found in architecture, design, and nature.

Mathematics is everywhere in our world but can seem to be invisible unless we take the time to point it out. Reading children’s books that accentuate the uses of mathematics offers insight and appreciation for the role of mathematics in our lives. Talking about the books we read makes reading more fun as well.  Sunday, September 25, is Math Storytelling Day, so take a trip to the library where you will find books that reveal mathematics in unexpected places to kick off a week of pleasure in reading books about mathematics. Read and enjoy!

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